Tax implications of unemployment benefits

Taxpayers who received unemployment benefits in 2009 are entitled to a special tax break when they file their 2009 federal tax returns. This tax break is part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009.  Here are five important facts the Internal Revenue Service wants you to know about your unemployment benefits. Unemployment compensation…

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Tax Credits for Education Expenses

College can be very expensive. To help students and their parents, the IRS offers the following five ways to offset education costs. The American Opportunity Credit This credit can help parents and students pay part of the cost of the first four years of college. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act modifies the existing Hope…

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Taxpayers with disabilites – tax credits and benefits

Taxpayers with disabilities may qualify for a number of IRS tax credits and benefits. Parents of children with disabilities may also qualify. Listed below are seven tax credits and other benefits that are available if you or someone else listed on your federal tax return is disabled. Standard Deduction Taxpayers who are legally blind may…

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What income is taxable?

While most income you receive is generally considered taxable, there are some situations when certain types of income are partially taxed or not taxed at all. To ensure taxpayers are familiar with the difference between taxable and non-taxable income, the Internal Revenue Service offers these common examples of items that are not included in your…

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New Vehicle Sales and Excise Tax Deduction

If you bought a new vehicle in 2009, you may be entitled to a special tax deduction for the sales and excise taxes on your purchase. Here are eight important facts the Internal Revenue Service wants you to know about this deduction: State and local sales and excise taxes paid on up to $49,500 of…

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Sex Change Surgery Is a Deductible Medical Expense (But Not Breast Augmentation)

Tax Court: In a long-awaited decision, a fractured (8-5-3) Tax Court today ruled in O’Donnabhain v. Commissioner, 134 T.C. No. 4 (Feb. 2, 2010), that male-to-female gender reassignment surgery qualifies as a deductible medical expense under § 213, reversing the IRS’s position in Chief Counsel Advice 200603025. The 8-judge majority held that: Taxpayer’s gender identity…

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Aliens and ‘Taxation Without Representation’

Erin E. Stefonick (J.D. 2008, Florida Coastal) has published Note. Find 10 Fla. Coastal L. Rev. 691′ target=_blank>The Alienability of Alien Suffrage: Taxation Without Representation in 2009, 10 Fla. Coastal L. Rev. 691 (2009). Here is part of the Introduction: Individuals seeking admission to the United States presently face more economic difficulty than ever before.…

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Governmant Retiree Credit

Certain government retirees who receive a government pension or annuity payment in 2009 may be eligible for the Government Retiree Credit. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 provides this one-time credit of $250 for certain federal and state pensioners. Here are seven things the IRS wants you to know about the Government Retiree…

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IRS Global High Wealth Industry Group

The IRS last year launched the Global High Wealth Industry Group to centralize and focus IRS compliance expertise involving high wealth individuals and their related entities. They are rich. They must be witches! I know let’s burn them at the stake and if they live we will admit our errors. This is a game-changing strategy…

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The NCAA, the IRS, and the ‘New Amateurism’

Virginia A. Fitt (J.D. 2010, Duke) has published Note, The NCAA’s Lost Cause and the Legal Ease of Redefining Amateurism, 59 Duke L.J. 555 (2009). Here is the abstract: The recent resolution of the Andrew Oliver case may mark the death throes of the NCAA’s no-agent rule, prohibiting college athletes from retaining agents in professional…

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