32,000 Taxpayers Adversely Affected: Did Not Receive Proper IRS Tax Lien Notification - John R. Dundon II, Enrolled Agent
8262
post-template-default,single,single-post,postid-8262,single-format-standard,bridge-core-3.0.1,qodef-qi--no-touch,qi-addons-for-elementor-1.5.5,qode-page-transition-enabled,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,,qode_grid_1300,footer_responsive_adv,qode-content-sidebar-responsive,qode-theme-ver-29.2,qode-theme-bridge,qode_header_in_grid,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-6.10.0,vc_responsive,elementor-default,elementor-kit-269
 

32,000 Taxpayers Adversely Affected: Did Not Receive Proper IRS Tax Lien Notification

32,000 Taxpayers Adversely Affected: Did Not Receive Proper IRS Tax Lien Notification

I had to read this report twice today. Check it out the IRS is not always following it’s own procedures or governing statutes when it comes to properly issuing tax liens. What? Really? How can this be? Before anyone gets too mad, I know as a matter of fact there are good hard working people worthy of respect at the IRS particularly in the appeals function. We should really thank our lucky stars for IRS Appeals because without this service it would be much more difficult to seek relief when situations like this are reported……

The Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration (TIGTA) reviewed a sample of 125 Federal tax liens filed for the 12-month period ending June 30, 2010 and could not determine whether all of these notices were mailed timely. TIGTA also found that the IRS did not always follow its own procedures for notifying taxpayers’ representatives that Federal tax lien notices had been filed. TIGTA estimated that more than 32,000 taxpayers may have been adversely affected. Also, in situations when a lien notice was returned as un-deliverable, TIGTA found that the IRS did not always resend these un-deliverable notices even though it had updated addresses for the taxpayers.      <– that is clearly avoidable.

Each year, TIGTA is legally required to determine whether tax lien notices issued by the IRS comply with the statutory requirement to notify taxpayers in writing, at their last known address, within five business days of the lien filings. The IRS also has its own procedures for notifying taxpayers’ representatives when Federal tax liens are filed. However, the IRS may not have always complied with this statutory requirement and it does not always follow its own procedures for timely notifying taxpayer representatives of the filing of lien notices, TIGTA found.

“Taxpayers have the right to receive timely notification of the filing of Federal tax liens,” said J. Russell George, Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration. “The IRS must ensure that the rights of these taxpayers are adequately protected,” he added.

Read the report here.



Share