Aliens and 'Taxation Without Representation' - John R. Dundon II, Enrolled Agent
7895
post-template-default,single,single-post,postid-7895,single-format-standard,bridge-core-3.0.1,qodef-qi--no-touch,qi-addons-for-elementor-1.5.4,qode-page-transition-enabled,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,,qode_grid_1300,footer_responsive_adv,qode-content-sidebar-responsive,qode-theme-ver-29.0,qode-theme-bridge,qode_header_in_grid,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-6.9.0,vc_responsive,elementor-default,elementor-kit-269
 

Aliens and ‘Taxation Without Representation’

Aliens and ‘Taxation Without Representation’

Erin E. Stefonick (J.D. 2008, Florida Coastal) has published Note. Find 10 Fla. Coastal L. Rev. 691′ target=_blank>The Alienability of Alien Suffrage: Taxation Without Representation in 2009, 10 Fla. Coastal L. Rev. 691 (2009). Here is part of the Introduction:

Individuals seeking admission to the United States presently face more economic difficulty than ever before. Particularly in a time where citizens and noncitizen immigrants alike are concerned about keeping their jobs and a roof over their heads, issues of taxation, health care, and public benefits affect immigrants in a substantial way. Specifically, current immigration laws require noncitizen immigrants–both lawful and unlawful classes–to pay taxes, but deny them the right to vote. In addition, noncitizen immigrants have experienced restricted access to health care since the Mayflower. Furthermore, noncitizen immigrants have been denied public benefits including “Supplemental Security Income and Food Stamps until they attain citizenship.” These issues raise criticism of the current immigration laws and beg reform to reflect the foundations of fairness and opportunity in America. Noncitizen immigrants should be given the right to vote at least at the local level, if not the national level, and the right to use public benefits if they are to be taxed.



Share