IRS Can Levy More Than 15% of Social Security Benefits According to Bowers V. US - John R. Dundon II, Enrolled Agent
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IRS Can Levy More Than 15% of Social Security Benefits According to Bowers V. US

IRS Can Levy More Than 15% of Social Security Benefits According to Bowers V. US

The distinction of how this is possible distills down to understanding the nuanced difference between a ‘Continuous’ and a ‘One Time’ IRS tax levy.

Under Code Sec. 6331(h) once a tax levy is approved, the effect of the levy on specified payments received by a taxpayer is continuous from the date the levy is first made until the levy is released. A continuous levy attaches to up to 15 percent of any specified payment including social security payments.

However as a one-time levy, the 15 percent cap on continuing levies under Code Sec. 6331(h) does not apply to monthly social security benefits allowing the IRS to take more than 50 percent of the taxpayer’s monthly benefit in Bowers v. U.S., 2012 PTC 133 (C.D. Ill. 5/22/12).

In the Bowers case we learn that according to the court, the IRS has discretion to approve continuous levies under either Code Sec. 6331(a) or (h) however it is not required to attach a continuous levy even where the type of property might be eligible for one.

The court stated in this case that social security payments represented a present, vested right to receive benefits in fixed monthly payments for the taxpayer’s life and the amount of the benefits are based upon a formula that included prior wages.

Because the social security benefits were not contingent on the performance of any additional services the tax levy could attach to the entire stream of Social Security payments as a one-time levy under Code Sec. 6331(a) and (b). Thus, the levy was considered a one-time levy.

As a one-time levy, the 15 percent cap on continuing levies under Code Sec. 6331(h) does not necessarily apply.

I think the lesson learned here is that if you are having your social security levied try to have it levied under IRC 6331(h) as a continuous levy subject to the 15% maximum threshold..



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