IRS Form W-12, IRS Paid Preparer Tax Identification Number (PTIN) - John R. Dundon II, Enrolled Agent
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IRS Form W-12, IRS Paid Preparer Tax Identification Number (PTIN)

IRS Form W-12, IRS Paid Preparer Tax Identification Number (PTIN)

All people making money preparing taxes must be registered with the IRS. If your paid tax return preparer is not registered with the IRS he/she is perpetrating fraud which will cause you future headaches. Don’t mess around with this.

The IRS has released a new Form W-12, IRS Paid Preparer Tax Identification Number (PTIN) Application that can be used if you choose to apply by mail. It’s available now. Form W-12 replaces Form W-7P, Application for Preparer Tax Identification Number. You should allow four to six weeks to receive your PTIN by mail.

Form W-12 is available on the IRS website. You will note that the link to the PTIN Registration System is contained in the instructions to Form W-12. Please be aware that the registration website is not fully functional. As of today, you cannot obtain or refresh your PTIN by using that site. Form 8945, PTIN Supplemental Application for U.S. Citizens without a Social Security Number Due To Conscientious Religious Objection and Form 8946, PTIN Supplemental Application for Foreign Persons without a Social Security Number are also available on the IRS website.



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